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How Much Is a Paint Sprayer?

Your Guide to How Much Is a Paint Sprayer


When making any electric-tool purchase, the cost is always a key factor. And, with spray machines encompassing a wide price range — from sub-$50 through to the high thousands — knowing what stands out as the best value is seriously challenging. This article explores why these machines vary in their wallet-hitting power, and what represents the best value across numerous price points.
Best Value for Money Top Pick

Wagner FLEXiO 5000


Our Rating: 4.9
Delivering pro-grade features but at an affordable price, this is perhaps the best value-for-money sprayer available. It boasts two nozzle heads for either large coverage or precise finishing-work, variable turbine power to adjust the delivery intensity, and a floor-standing external turbine casing that doubles as a storage case.
Features

  • Features Wagner’s versatile iSpray and Detail Finish tips.
  • Easy-connect hose couplings.
  • Can deliver thin and dense mediums.

Product Comparison Table

IMAGE PRODUCT DETAILS
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Format: Handheld
  • Cup Capacity: 0.85-quart
  • Nozzle: Control Finish

Features

  • Ergonomic handle.
  • Excellent for newbie spray gun users.
  • Adjustable material flow control.

Product Rating: 4.5/5

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  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Format: Handheld
  • Cup Capacity: 0.85-quart
  • Nozzle: Control Finish

Features

  • Three spray patterns.
  • Ideal for fine-finishing projects.
  • Propels lacquers, stains, sealers, and varnishes.

Product Rating: 4.6/5

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  • Power unit: Airless hydraulic pump
  • Format: Handheld
  • Cup Capacity: One quart
  • Nozzle: 0.015-inch

Features

  • One of the most powerful handheld sprayers on the market.
  • FlexLiner system for swift color switches.
  • Substantial nozzle guard for tip longevity.

Product Rating: 4.0/5

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  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Format: Floor-standing
  • Cup Capacity: 0.85 and 1.5-quart
  • Nozzle: iSpray and Detail Finish

Features

  • Adjustable air and material flow control.
  • Lock-N-Go feature enables effortless cleaning.
  • Variable X-Boost turbine power.

Product Rating: 4.8/5

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  • Power unit: Airless hydraulic pump
  • Format: Skid-mounted
  • Cup Capacity: None — direct draw
  • Nozzle: 515 tip

Features

  • A prosumer machine at an affordable price point.
  • Propels unthinned paints.
  • Can support up to 75 feet of hose.

Product Rating: 4.7/5

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  • Power unit: Four-stage turbine
  • Format: Floor standing
  • Cup Capacity: 0.63-quart
  • Nozzle: 1.3 mm

Features

  • Non-bleed gravity-feed gun.
  • Heat dissipation feature to prolong turbine life.
  • Noise reduction cover.

Product Rating: 4.9/5

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  • Power unit: Five-stage turbine
  • Format: Floor standing
  • Cup Capacity: 0.63-quart
  • Nozzle: 1.0 mm

Features

  • Sprays latex, gels, clears, multi-specs, and bases.
  • Detailed info feedback from the LCD screen.
  • Gun holder on turbine casing.

Product Rating: 4.9/5

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How Much Is a Paint Sprayer? — The Ultimate Price Guide to Power Painters


When selecting the ideal machine — the burning question on most prospective consumer’s minds is, how much is a paint sprayer?

The truth is, the paint spray gun price varies across makes, models, and formats — ranging from little more than an evening out at your favorite restaurant up to the cost of a small family car.

This guide pulls back the curtain and reveals how easy or tough the best sprayers are on your pocket — and what you can expect to receive in return for your hard-earned dollars.

How Much Are Paint Sprayers? — The Cost-Affecting Factors

If you haven’t the time to read this entire article, I’ll tell you straight away the price of paint sprayer — it’s anywhere from $30 through to $8000.

Not much help, is it?

You see, the cost of an individual power painter is based on an absolute plethora of factors, including the durability, design, capabilities, and target market of the machine. And, more expensive doesn’t necessarily mean a better sprayer — there’s little point in spending half a year’s salary on a contractor-grade unit if all you’re going to use it for is staining some bookshelves.

So, to make the price points easier to comprehend — and to ensure you select the consummate machine for your needs — here are the main (non-exhaustive) features that affect the unit’s cost.

Brand

Unsurprisingly, the more recognizable the manufacturer’s marque — the more costly the sprayer will be. In the power-painting niche, this is the big-boy brands of Titan, Earlex, Wagner, Fuji, and Graco.

For example, take the awesome Wagner 2000. This versatile DIY-focused power painter is similarly specced to the budget Meterk (who?) HVLP gun — yet is three times more expensive.

However, don’t fall into the trap of thinking that machines that simply share the same features are equal.

With the major industry-players, you’re getting more than just knobs and dials. These spray painting specialists deliver units that are built to withstand intense use, provide helpful customer support via telephone and email, and manufacture products that include extensive warranties.

Furthermore, as these brands typically concentrate only on the spray painting niche — they’re able to provide a mammoth catalog of spare and replaceable parts for your gun. This isn’t the case with bargain-basement units, where, once they break down usually need to be thrown into the trash.

Format

Paint sprayers come in three main formats — turbine, airless, and pneumatic.

Typically, due to the technology involved in their manufacturer — fans or hydraulic pumps — turbines are lighter on the pocket than airless machines for the same target market. To see the relative benefits of each of these spraying types, check out my Air Vs Airless face-off.

However, pneumatics are a little more challenging to price categorize — as they cannot be used straight-outta-the box. While these guns can be picked up for as little as $20 — they also require the purchase of a high-pressure hose and an electric or gasoline-powered compressor.

Target Market
Although the lines are often blurred, industry-pros typically separate paint sprayers into four categories of user — casual or budget, DIY, prosumer, and professional — with the price steadily increasing across these classifications.

Casual Use/Budget Sprayers

As the name suggests, this area features paint sprayers for the low-frequency, home user that may not use their machine more than a few times per year. As the most price-friendly units on the market — they’re usually available for $60 or less. Examples include the Meterk HVLP and the Rexbeti 750.

However, as low-intensity machines, they lack the durability and robustness for anything more than intermittent use. Furthermore, it’s impossible to find anything other than handheld turbines in this category.

DIY Sprayers

Slightly more costly than the casual use units — around $60-$150 — the DIY niche is the most competitive arena in power painting, and includes pneumatic, airless, and turbine models.

These machines have the durability to cope with frequent DIY weekend use, have more user-tailorable features than the budget sprayers, yet remain straightforward to operate.

While the category is dominated by the mighty Wagner SprayTech — with its flagship FLEXiO 3000 — other big-names make some impressive home-improvement units, such as the HomeRight Finish Max and the Graco TrueCoat.

Prosumer Sprayers

This is the area where amateur spraying becomes serious business. Prosumer units — generally in the price range of $150-$450 — are machines that attempt to bridge the gap between DIY and trade-grade models.

As such, the turbines and airless machines can cope with more intense use than standard DIY sprayers, generally include a pro-standard gun or nozzle, and typically boast accurate power control. Pneumatic prosumer guns often feature LVLP and HVLP tech, include variable air and material flow control, and often arrive with an inline regulator and gauge.

Examples include the hydraulic Graco X5, the HVLP Wagner 5000, and the compressor-driven DeVilbiss FinishLine.

Professional Sprayers

If you have the cash — then you can own one of the ultimate painting machines in the spraying arena.

Starting around $500 for a turbine or airless example, these units are true workhorses. Possessing the durability and throughput rating to be used all day, every day — they’re the go-to machine of the trade contractor.

In addition to higher power settings than prosumer models, versatile user-controllability, and often boasting a floor-stand or cart — these sprayers often feature rapid-replacement pumps and filters together with reversible tips to reduce time-costing downtime. Furthermore, with access to a wide catalog of replacement parts — they can be upgraded or modified to suit the user-specific requirements.

Although you can pick up a solid and reliable pro unit for $500 — that’s just the beginning, as costs escalate significantly as features increase. For example, an LCD-controlled unit such as the turbine-driven Apollo 5 Precision is as hard on the wallet as a holiday to Europe. And the gasoline-powered airless Graco GH230 is the same cost as a compact automobile — possibly making it the most expensive spray gun on the market.

User Tailorable Features
The amount of features usually corresponds to the target-market as indicated above — the prosumer and contractor models typically offer more user-tailorable controls than the budget and DIY.

That said, within each user-category, these specifications vary, which has an impact on price. Hence, expect to shell out more dollars for airless and turbine units that incorporate one or more of the following features:

  • Choice of spray patterns.
  • Variable material volume flow.
  • Adjustable turbine or hydraulic pump output.
  • Spray width control.
  • Variety of tip sizes.
  • Multi-capacity paint containers.

Paint Sprayer Prices — The Best Machines in Each Cost Range


So, you have a dollar value in your mind that you’re willing to pay for your new, shiny power painter — but what’s the best machine you can buy for that spray gun price?

To save you time comparing brands, costs, functions, and specs — I’ve curated the ultimate machines across the main price bands below. Where possible, I’ve tried to cover every model format — airless, turbine, or pneumatic — for each cost range, although bear in mind there are exceptions. For example, you can’t purchase an airless unit for less than $50 — hence, no model is included.

The Best Sprayers Under $50

Our Rating: 4.5
With straightforward operation, this is the ideal machine for the paint spraying newbie. Its 0.85-quart acrylic container provides ample capacity for the majority of household applications — sufficient to cover 70 square feet without refilling. Its Wagner-manufactured Control Finish nozzle offers precise control on fine finishing work, and is compatible with stains, varnishes, lacquers, and sealers.
Features

  • Lock-No-Go system for rapid dismantling.
  • Choice of three spray patterns.
  • Cord protector to extend longevity.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Pneumatic

Astro 4008


Our Rating: 4.3

A gun that’s ideal for painting walls, fencing, cabinets, and automobiles. Its versatile 1.8-mm tip will cope with enamels, stains, glue, and acrylic-based mediums. And, featuring adjustable spray-width patterns, you can tailor your paint delivery to suit your base material. A proprietary anti-spill air feed line means the gun works while inverted — with no unwelcome drips. Furthermore, its one-quart aluminum paint container offers substantial coverage capacity while remaining lightweight.
Features

  • 50-60 PSI output.
  • Lightweight.
  • Requires a small compressor — just three horsepower.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Under $100

Our Rating: 4.6
An impressive fine-finishing gun that incorporates Wagner’s proprietary Control Finish nozzle — making it ideal for addressing moldings, small projects, and trim work. The handheld HVLP unit knocks out a steady 0.33 gallons per minute and is rated for both indoor and outdoor applications. Its 0.85-quart cup provides sufficient capacity for the majority of modestly-sized jobs, and featuring proprietary Lock-N-Go tech, you can effortlessly dismantle the sprayer post-project for headache-free cleaning.
Features

  • Extensive warranty.
  • Fatigue-preventing handle.
  • Three spray fan pattern choices.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Pneumatic

Astro EVOT14


Our Rating: 4.3

An LVLP pneumatic gun that delivers both accuracy, ultra-fine atomization, and finesse — making it excel in woodwork, cabinet, and automotive projects. Its forged, anodized aluminum body provides reassuring protection from corrosion while adding impressive durability. Furthermore, you can select between either a 1.3 or 1.4 mm nozzle to suit your most commonly used mediums, while a soft-pull trigger staves off digit fatigue on substantial jobs.
Features

  • Durable forged and anodized body.
  • Trademarked ‘air curtain’ prevents overspray.
  • Lightweight at just 0.6 pounds.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Under $150

Our Rating: 4.6
Two cup sizes — one quart and 1.5-quarts — in conjunction with the versatile Control Finish nozzle permit this external-drive HVLP sprayer to work as both a small and large project painter — suitable for anything from furniture restoration through to fence weatherproofing. Its lengthy 20-foot non-kinking hose permits impressive operational freedom and its powerful two-stage turbine can propel dense mediums such as chalks and latexes. Additionally, you can tailor the fan pattern and volume flow to suit your coating medium and target material.
Features

  • A powerful unit that offers straightforward operation.
  • Ground-sitting turbine — reduces handheld weight.
  • Aluminum and acrylic cups included.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Our Rating: 4.3

A mighty airless handheld that knocks out an impressive 1500 PSI — providing both fine atomization through its 0.015-inch tip and enabling the unit to deliver the densest of paints. Proprietary VacuValve tech permits the machine to spray from any angle — even upside down — making it ideal for overhead work such as ceilings. And, boasting disposable FlexLiner bags, switching between colors, and post-project cleaning is effortless.
Features

  • Two tips — for wide and narrow spray delivery.
  • Reversible tip permits straightforward blockage removal.
  • Stainless steel pump for longevity.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.6
Perhaps the ultimate HVLP pneumatic gun on the market. This fine-finish shooter — primarily for automotive work, but also excelling as a furniture and cabinet restorer — incorporates an accurate 1.3 mm needle. As it’s gravity-fed with a 0.63-quart cup, compressor requirements are low, demanding just 6.5 CFM (cubic feet per minute) at 30 PSI. And, with stainless steel internal chambers, oxidation and corrosion are kept at bay, extending the life of the gun.
Features

  • Arrives complete with a cleaning kit.
  • Pro-grade gun but at a DIY price.
  • Adjustable air and material flow control.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Under $200

Our Rating: 4.8

A prosumer-grade external turbine sprayer that’s suitable for large indoor and outdoor projects. Its versatile iSpray head can deliver a plethora of mediums — from thin stains through to dense latexes — while an additional Detail nozzle permits you to accurately finish trim and molding. Two paint cups — 0.85 and 1.5-quarts — allow you to choose the correct container for your job size, and a proprietary X-boost turbine feature offers adjustable power for the ultimate in application control.
Features

  • Turbine casing doubles as a storage container.
  • Two spray fan settings.
  • 11.5-foot hose.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Our Rating: 4.3

The most affordable stand-mounted airless sprayer in the market. Delivering 3000 PSI from its hydraulic pump, this unit excels at substantial-scale jobs and can propel dense latexes, epoxies, and chalks. Two included tips — sizes 513 and 517 — enable you to choose the perfect air head for your medium, and a suction line with an incorporated filter permits you to draw from an original paint can — meaning no refilling. Additionally, this sprayer is supported on a robust tubular frame — elevating the base unit to protect from dirt, dust, and moisture ingress.
Features

  • 25-foot hose.
  • 0.625 horsepower hydraulic pump.
  • Trade-grade gun with reversible tip.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.6
A complete pneumatic LVLP kit, making it ideal for newbie compressor painters. It features two spray guns — one for fine finishing work and another for more significantly-sized jobs. In addition to the shooters, this set includes an inline regulator and gauge, gun wrench, cleaning kit, and a choice of four nozzles — 1.3, 1.5, 1.7, and 2.0 mm. Furthermore, this unit can run off small, home-style compressors — requiring just 3.9 CFM at 30 PSI.
Features

  • Two paint cups — 0.625 and 1.06-quarts.
  • Gravity feed and siphon feed containers.
  • Adjustable fan width from 7-10.9 inches.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Under $500

Turbine

Fuji 2202


Our Rating: 4.8

Focusing on the serious DIY and light-contractor, this floor-standing two-stage turbine sprayer possesses 1400-watts of serious grunt — not just ensuring rapid coverage but also permitting the delivery of dense mediums. The pro-grade gun features a fine-atomizing stainless steel 1.3 mm tip, fed by an aluminum siphon-feed one-quart cup. And, boasting 25-feet of non-kinking hose, it allows significant operational freedom while negating paint-flow ruining pinches and bends.
Features

  • Includes cleaning brush and viscosity cup.
  • Robust metal turbine housing for hardcore use.
  • The case features a storage stand for the gun.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Our Rating: 4.3

Providing trade-grade functionality and performance but at an affordable price, this prosumer-level airless sprayer delivers a mighty 3000 PSI — enabling the propulsion of viscous milks and latexes while allowing speedy coverage on larger projects. The industry-respected SG2 gun with its 515 tip provides an impressive clean coat, while proprietary PushPrime tech takes the headaches out of pre-job set-up. Additionally, this sprayer boasts a lengthy 25-foot hose to reduce frequent relocation of the base unit and a suction line allows the machine to draw paint from an original can.
Features

  • 0.5 horsepower hydraulic pump.
  • User-controllable pressure settings.
  • Lightweight for an external-drive airless — just 13 pounds.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.6
A true pro-grade pneumatic HVLP gun that features lightweight aluminum construction for fatigue-free use — weighing just 1.02 pounds. Complete with two stainless steel tips — 1.4 and 2.0 mm — this gun promises fine atomization and low spray with thin stains and dense primers. User-tailorability is at the heart of this shooter, with adjustable fan pattern, air pressure, and volume flow. Furthermore, the 1.06-quart metal cup provides pleasing capacity, and, being gravity-fed, means that compressor power can be kept to a minimum for the ultimate control.
Features

  • Low density and high viscosity compatible.
  • Durable and robust for extreme use.
  • Easy-turn dials.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Under $1000

Our Rating: 4.8

While a contractor-grade machine, this external-drive HVLP sprayer is at a price point within reach of the hardcore DIYer. Its mammoth four-stage turbine packs some mighty 9.5 PSI of grunt, permitting it to deliver the most viscous of paints. Heat dissipation tech ensures the unit remains cool even on extended use — increasing the longevity of the machine. Additionally, its noise-reduction housing makes operation more pleasant and less of an annoyance for your customers.
Features

  • Award-winning T75G gravity gun with 1.3 mm tip.
  • 0.63-quart paint cup capacity.
  • Made in Canada.
  • Design
  • Functionality

Our Rating: 4.9

Considered by industry-pros to be one of the best contractor airless units on the market, this brawny machine effortlessly delivers thick acrylics and latexes with its mighty 0.625 horsepower hydraulic pump. Propelling paint at an eye-watering 0.47 gallons every minute — it’s ideal for the tradesperson demanding speedy coverage on large-scale, time-sensitive projects. Its 515 tip ensures fine atomization, while non-fluctuating continuous pressure tech guarantees a flawless coat. Furthermore, a ProConnect system means that you can replace the pump without dismantling the sprayer — reducing operational downtime.
Features

  • 50-feet of non-kinking hose.
  • Trade-level property renovation sprayer.
  • Speedy-clean QuikAccess feeding valve.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.6
A bold aesthetic, created by the Italian car designer Pininfarina, makes this gun the ultimate choice for the discerning power painter. Designed to operate at any temperature or climate, this shooter is ideal for indoor spray booths or outdoor project work. Advanced atomization from its 1.3 mm spray tip produces a glass-like finish — excellent for automotive resprays. Additionally, the gravity-feeding acrylic cup is both transparent and printed with indices — allowing you to achieve the perfect dilution on denser mediums.
Features

  • Low-volume delivery to reduce overspray, dripping, and pooling.
  • Complete with a gun wrench and cleaning brush.
  • Ideal topcoat and clear coat spray gun.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

The Best Sprayers Over $1000

Our Rating: 4.5

Possibly the ultimate machine in the entire HVLP niche. Powered by a behemoth five-stage turbine, it delivers 80 percent transfer efficiency — dramatically reducing wastage. LCD control permits you to adjust the output intensity from one-to-ten PSI in small 0.1 PSI increments, while also giving feedback on operational temperature, idling time, and running hours. It boasts Apollo’s category-leading 7700 spray gun, drawing from 32 feet of hose. Proprietary QuadraClean filters shield the floor-standing turbine from damage, while novel PowerPause tech automatically switches the unit into idling-mode when not in use — prolonging the life of the motor.
Features

  • Incorporated gun-docking system.
  • Extensive five-year warranty.
  • Three spray fan patterns.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Airless

Graco GH230


Our Rating: 4.4

An absolute beast of a machine — with a paint sprayer cost equal to that of a two-week cruise. The only gasoline-powered unit in this rundown, the GH230 boasts a reliable Honda 6.5 horsepower motor, capable of knocking out 3300 PSI from its cart-mounted airless hydraulic pump. This means it can handle the mother-of-all dense mediums, including elastomerics, block fillers, epoxies, and drywall compounds. Rated for 200 gallons of throughput per week, this unit is a true daily-use sprayer. And, if the gas-supply runs out, you can plug it into a mains outlet and run off electricity.
Features

  • Cart-mounted on heavily treaded pneumatic tires.
  • 100-foot hose.
  • Massive 1.55 gallons per minute delivery.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

How Much Is a Spray Paint Gun Conclusion


So, how much is a paint gun?

The answer is, as much as you’re happy and willing to pay.

Ranging from sub-$50 units through to sprayers that cost over $7k, there’s a machine that not just suits your pocket, but also your skill level, project requirements, and size constraints. And while all the sprayers in this article exemplify the best units at particular price points — there are three machines that I believe deserve a particular mention.

The budget-level HomeRight Quick Finish is highly affordable and straightforward in operation — yet still promises a pleasing finish combined with reliability. For DIYers who have aspirations to ‘go-pro’, there are few more impressive sprayers than the airless Graco X5. And for the true tradesperson, the ProConnect 390, with its rapid delivery and downtime saving pump replacement is a real contractor workhorse.

If you’ve found this How Much Is a Paint Sprayer article useful and informative, please feel free to share it with your buddies!

How Much Does a Paint Sprayer Cost FAQs

Q: Is a Paint Sprayer Worth It?

Yes. A paint sprayer delivers the coating medium up to ten times faster than a brush, and with fine atomization, it provides a more pleasing coat that’s free from brushstrokes and lost bristles.

Q: What Is a Typical Paint Gun Price?

You can pick up a good quality, casual use DIY machine for around $50 — such as the HomeRight Quick Finish. However, prices range from this starting point to the 1000s of dollars — depending on the features, throughput rating, build quality, and brand.

Q: How Much Is a Paint Gun for Cars?

For automotive bodywork, you need a pneumatic HVLP spray gun — such as the Eastwood Concours Pro. You’re looking for a gun that offers low overspray, combined with the ability to deliver both dense primers and thin clears. For a high-quality unit — expect to pay between $100-$200.

Q: Are Airless Paint Sprayers Expensive?

You can buy a budget airless unit, such as the Himalaya Power Painter, for less than $200. For prosumer-grade sprayers, like the Graco X5, prices range from $200-$400. Generally speaking, airless machines are harder on the pocket than comparable turbine examples.

Q: How Much Is a HVLP Sprayer?

You can buy a quality HVLP turbine machine for around $50-$100. HVLP pneumatic guns are similarly priced — but remember they involve the purchase of an additional compressor to run the unit.

Q: Should I Buy a Used Paint Sprayer?

If you don’t know and trust the seller, nor have access to the machine’s history and maintenance record — I wouldn’t advise it. Sprayers require a little TLC after use — including complete flushing, intense cleaning, and checking of O-rings. If these necessary steps have been neglected — the internal pump or turbine could be damaged.

When you consider that you can purchase the impressive and reliable Wagner Control Spray 250 for less than $100 — it’s not worth going for a secondhand unit.