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Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer Review

Editor Rating: 4.4/5

Great Product

Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer

Reviewed by: Timothy Henderson

Last modified: Nov 10, 2020 @ 5:09 am

  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Review Summary:

Pumping out a mighty 3000 psi — the Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer is applicable for medium to large-scale projects both inside and outside the home. At an accessible price point — this machine may attract ambitious DIYers looking to explore the compressor and turbine-free spraying world.

Promising 55 percent less overspray than its airless competitors, this unit should deliver a satisfying finish without paint wastage. And, featuring a non-kinking 25-foot hose — the sprayer allows for impressive operational freedom.

It’s two included nozzle tips and variable pressure control make this unit compatible with a multitude of paint viscosities — including stains, sealers, enamels, latex, and chalk-based mediums — usually without thinning.

A lightweight spray gun allows for fatigue-free work. It facilitates a choice of three spray patterns, incorporates a lock-out design, and comes complete with a textured comfort handle for agreeable use.

Incorporating a suction tube with an inlet filter — this machine requires no filling. Simply attach to an original paint or stain can and you’re ready to go (well, once the unit is primed). Furthermore, a substantial tubular frame protects the unit from damage and assists with portability.

This sprayer, sold under the Himalaya Hardware brand, appears to be a third party machine — given a new marque for the power tool retail market. Currently, it seems that there are no other products under this branding — and the customer service number takes you to Kozyard LLC — an OEM (original equipment manufacturer) company with its headquarters in Seattle.

Pros:

N
25-foot power cord.
N
Excellent for large scale work.
N
Adjustable pressure control.
N
Airless.
N
Suitable for airless novices.
N
Suction hose for fill-free operation.
N
Substantial frame.
N
Comfort spray gun handle.

Cons:

N
Unknown manufacturer.
N
Obtaining replacement parts may be tough.
N
No carrying handle.

Features and Benefits of the Himalaya Airless Spray Gun Power Painter


Knocking out 0.63 horsepower of grunt — this is a powerful machine considering its affordable price point. However, it’s not all about the size of your engine. Time to dive deeper into this unit’s features to see if this comparatively unknown manufacturer has the goods to compete with the spraying big boys.

Pump With Variable Control


Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Pump up the volume
Get down!

So sang the popular dance-combo MARRS back in 1987. And, with their incessant-obsession with turning up the power — I know they’d appreciate the variable pressure control of the Himalaya Spray Station (who knows, considering they disappeared after just one hit — they could be working in the painting and decorating industry today).

A substantial knob mounted on the pump housing allows you to lower or increase the pump pressure — up to a maximum of 3000 psi at 0.28 gpm (gallons per minute). Not only does this permit you to tailor your coating thickness to your base material — but also enables you to whack it up for denser mediums and bring it down for thinner stains.

My main concern is that should you overwork this pump — the relative obscurity of the brand may make obtaining replacement parts a challenge.

Spray Gun


If you’re dropping the turbine and venturing into the airless spraying sphere for the first time — perhaps the most significant difference you’ll notice is how lightweight the gun is.

With both the ‘engine’ and the paint container being separate from the gun — unlike handheld HVLP machines — the ‘shooter’ has no extraneous components. Thus placing less stress and effort on the hand and wrists — and permitting you to complete mammoth projects without fatigue.

A nice inclusion with the Himalaya unit is the two nozzle tips — sizes 513 and 517. This empowers you to select the ideal gun-end for your working medium — the smaller for thinner stains and sealers, and the larger for denser chalk and latex liquids — typically without the chore of pre-thinning,

Furthermore, the handle of the paint-pistol is both rubberized and significantly knurled — increasing traction in the hand and allowing for a comfortable and relaxed grip. And, being connected to a lengthy 25-foot cable — you’re given extensive operating freedom.

Suction Line with Filter


For the casual DIYer — turbine sprayers are usually the go-to machine. They’re remarkably uncomplicated to operate and are pleasingly cost-effective.

However, their main downside is that they require filling with paint or stain. Not only can this be a messy process — especially if you don’t have a funnel — but it also means having to stop-and-start to replenish during larger jobs.

Hence, it’s nice to see that the Himalaya unit comes with a suction hose — allowing you to draw your spraying medium directly from an original container. Furthermore, the business end of this sucking line is fitted with a mesh screen — preventing dirt ingress into the pump — elongating its lifespan and ensuring your final coat finish is pleasingly detritus-free.

Two Spray Patterns


Twisting the nozzle end adjusts the spray pattern — providing either a horizontal or vertical plume.

This means that you select the perfect delivery for your project. For example, for wider areas — such as fence panels — choose the horizontal. For slimmer jobs, such as painting railings — opt for the vertical.

This both provides the consummate finish on your job — and prevents paint or stain wastage.

Robust Stand


The pump unit is housed within a tubular metal frame — elevating the unit from the floor and thus preventing dirt or water ingress — especially welcome if you’re using the unit outside. Furthermore, it provides protection to the pump from knocks and bumps — useful if you’re transporting the machine in the back of your pick-up truck or van.

Additionally, by grasping the horizontal bar — you can move the unit one-handedly — ideal if you’re already grasping the spray gun with the other hand. However, I do find it extremely surprising that this frame doesn’t include a rubber, plastic, or foam cover to assist with gripping traction.

What do The Users Say?


While I consider the Himalaya sprayer to be an unchallenging machine to operate and feature-packed — I’m not using this unit on a week-to-week basis. Sure, it may have the appearance of a hardcore industrial unit — but does it deliver the finish and possess the robustness that intense use demands?

To gather a more balanced perspective — I investigated the online Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer reviews from owners of this machine — to reveal how this sprayer functions in the real world.

Predominantly, the opinions put forward by users of the Himalaya were positive. Guys praised its comparatively low-price point, welcomed the variable pressure control, and commended its filling-negating suction-line.

Although to be fair, there were some words of discontent.

Frequently mentioned was the fact that despite the tubular housing — the plastic case of the pump didn’t have the durability to stand up to hardcore use. Additionally, a few owners mentioned that understanding the priming mechanism was burdensome — but to be fair, that’s a process you have to get a grasp with on any airless unit.

Yet overall, DIYers experienced with the Himalaya Sprayer lauded its smooth and rapid coverage. If you want a taste for yourself of the consensus of opinion, check out the owner’s testimonies.

Alternatives to Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer


It’s understandable if this Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer review hasn’t made your painting senses tingle. Admittedly, it’s not suitable for everyone.

Horses for courses, right?

So, if you believe that this machine is more of a pit pony than a thoroughbred stallion — check out these worthwhile alternatives.

Goplus Airless Paint Sprayer


Should the flow rate of the Himalaya be a little too weedy for your needs — this sprayer may appeal.

The Goplus Airless offers many of the same features of the Himalaya (as it’s made by the same OEM, just under a different brand name) — yet provides a greater flow rate of 0.32 gpm in comparison with 0.28 gpm.

  • Harder on the pocket than the Himalaya.
  • Incorporates a carry handle — not on the Himalaya model.
  • As with the Himalaya, the Goplus delivers 3000 psi and 0.63 hp.

Graco 17G180 Magnum ProX19


If you think the DIY nature of the Himalaya lacks sufficient robustness for intense or tradesperson-worthy use — this may be the solution.

The Graco 17G180 is a genuine pro-grade unit — capable of delivering over 500 gallons throughout a working year. Furthermore, a cart design enables easy transportation and a proprietary InstaClean filter ensures debris-free pump-longevity.

  • Seriously tougher on the wallet than the Himalaya.
  • A behemoth 50-foot hose as opposed to the 25-foot Himalaya.
  • Larger flow rate — 0.38 gpm in comparison to the Himalaya’s 0.28 gpm.

Wagner Control Pro 150


Want an airless unit from a sprayer brand that you recognize and trust instead of a company that you heard of for the first time today? If that sounds like your mindset — take a look at this machine by painting Godfathers, Wagner SprayTech.

While having a lower pressure output than the Himalaya (1500 psi contrasting with the Himalaya’s 3000 psi) — this unit offers an impressive warranty and easy-access to replacement parts.

  • Higher price point than the Himalaya.
  • Complete with a 515 tip, as opposed to the 513 and 517 of the Himalaya.
  • Like the GoPlus, it has a 25-foot hose.

Conclusion


The Himalaya is a suitable unit for medium to large scale projects — from painting banisters and stairs through to staining decking and fencing.

Unchallenging operation and a pleasing price point may stoke the interest of enthusiastic DIYers or airless new-kids-on-the-block. Its powerful pump and choice of two nozzles permit the use of a wide spectrum of spraying mediums.

Furthermore, variable pressure enables you to alter delivery volume, and a suction line means saying goodbye to pre-project container filling.

Admittedly, there are questions whether this machine has the durability to stand up to frequent or intense use. Furthermore, should a component fail, access to replacement parts may be challenging from this comparatively unknown brand.

But, if all you’re after is a fair-priced and practical turbine-free home use tool — you can do worse than check out the Himalaya Airless Paint Sprayer.

The FAQ

How Much Does the Himalaya Paint Sprayer Cost?

The Himalaya airless machine is capable of rapid coverage and ideally suited to large-sized home improvement work. To check out its current price, take a look here.

Will the Himalaya Airless Sprayer Draw from a 5 Gallon Can?
Yes. The suction line with its incorporated filter will allow you to take paint or stain from an original five-gallon container.
Where Can I Find a Himalaya Paint Sprayer Manual?

As there’s no official Himalaya website, finding out information on the machine can be troublesome. However, I’ve located the Himalaya user manual here.

Do You Need an Air Compressor for the Himalaya Paint Sprayer Airless?
No. As an airless machine — the Himalaya Sprayer doesn’t utilize air to propel your staining or painting medium. Instead, it uses an internal electric pump.
How Many Gallons Does the Himalaya Sprayer Airless Hold?
Unlike a turbine-powered machine — the Himalaya Airless Sprayer doesn’t hold any paint. Instead, it draws the spraying medium directly from an original can via means of a suction hose.
Does the Himalaya Airless Spray Acrylic Latex Outdoor Paint?
Yes. In most cases, the Himalaya Sprayer will propel latex acrylic paints without thinning. Ideally, have the pressure variable control set to maximum and utilize the included 517 tip.

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