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The Best HVLP Spray Gun for Woodworking: Buyer’s Guide, Reviews, Comparisons, and How To Spray Wood

With the best HVLP spray gun for woodworking, you can say goodbye to the lost bristles, bubbles, and brushmarks associated with traditional manual staining and varnishing. These versatile sprayers are ideally suited to delivering sealers, polyurethanes, shellacs, and lacquers. Plus, some powerful units are capable of knocking out dense primers and oil-based gloss paints. Fine atomization promises a showroom-like finish, while their HVLP format eliminates overspray, bounceback, and wastage. The range extends from compact and portable handheld units through to hefty external turbine models, so there are sprayers available for both DIYers and pros.

Our Top Pick
Wagner Control Spray Double Duty
A steady delivery of 4.9 ounces per minute permits accurate application with little risk of over-drenching. Wagner’s patented Control Finish nozzle guarantees a consistent and flaw-free coat, while the inclusion of two differently sized paint containers makes the unit suitable for both small and medium-scale woodworking projects.
Features
  • 1 and 1.5-quart containers.
  • Complete with a viscosity cup.
  • Three spray patterns and variable material flow control.
  • Lock-N-Go technology.
Product Rating: 4.6/5

Product Comparison Table

IMAGE PRODUCT DETAILS
  • Format: Handheld
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Paint cup: 1 and 1.5-quart.
  • Hose/cord length: 6-foot cord.

Features

  • Includes two paint containers.
  • Precise Control Finish nozzle.
  • Comes complete with a viscosity cup.

Product Rating: 4.6/5

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  • Format: Floor-standing
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Paint cup: 1.5-quart
  • Hose/cord length: 15-foot hose

Features

  • iSpray nozzle technology for an even finish.
  • Suitable for unthinned paints.
  • 15 ounces per minute spray delivery.

Product Rating: 4.5/5

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  • Format: Handheld
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Paint cup: 1.25-quart
  • Hose/cord length: 18 inches

Features

  • Adjustable material flow control.
  • Three interchangeable spray tips.
  • Powerful 450-watt motor.

Product Rating: 4.4/5

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  • Format: Handheld
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Paint cup: 0.875 quart
  • Hose/cord length: 6-foot cord

Features

  • Twelve ventilation slots.
  • Ideal staining unit.
  • Lock-N-Go feature for rapid dismantling.

Product Rating: 4.3/5

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  • Format: Pneumatic gun
  • Power unit: External compressor
  • Paint cup: 0.63 quart
  • Hose/cord length: None included

Features

  • Easy-fill container.
  • Adjustable material flow dial.
  • Three-finger trigger with easy-pull feature

Product Rating: 4.3/5

Check Price at Amazon
  • Format: Floor standing
  • Power unit: Turbine
  • Paint cup: 1 quart.
  • Hose/cord length: 25 feet.

Features

  • Metal non-bleed spray gun.
  • Rotating air cap for multi-angle spraying.
  • 1.3-mm nozzle tip.

Product Rating: 4.3/5

Check Price at Amazon

The Best HVLP Spray Gun for Woodworking: Buying Guide

Finely crafted wood deserves a perfect finish, and for a blemish-free and perfectly smooth coat, you need the best HVLP spray gun for woodworking.

These affordable tools take your timber coverage to pro-levels, protecting the wood beneath and providing an eye-catching and pleasing appearance. Faster than a brush and ensuring no brush marks or embedded bristles ruining your finish, these versatile units are as suited to hobbyist crafters as they are trade woodworkers.

Why You Need the Best HVLP Spray Gun for Woodworking

While a few of your woodworking projects may involve leaving the timber bare, the majority will require finishing with paint or varnish. Not only does covering your wood protect the material from knocks, bumps, and moisture ingress, but a well-chosen coating can make your craft or furniture work ‘pop’ — whether your handiwork includes furniture restoring, cabinet making, or even wooden toy building.

However, wood is a notoriously difficult material to address.

Grain direction, natural imperfections, and its propensity to soak up your coating material like a sponge provide challenges for the DIY or trade woodworker — an issue exacerbated by the traditional handheld brush.

The timber coverage staples of varnish, stains, and shellacs are seriously unforgiving — pretty much like my wife. The slightest mistakes are exaggerated and will torment you for years to come — again, like my other half.

These mediums are inherently sticky, acting as a magnet to any loose bristles. Furthermore, every brushstroke you make becomes a historical record of your work, displaying every pass and removing any chance of a smooth, sheer finish.

But, if you obtain one of the best spray guns for woodworking, your projects will have a showroom-like coat.

The advantages of using a spray gun for woodworking include:

  • Can cover an area ten times faster than a brush.
  • Provides ultra-atomized spray for the cleanest of finishes.
  • There are no bristles to become embedded in your lacquer or shellac.
  • Eliminates the risk of tell-tale brush marks.
  • Can propel paints, stains, lacquers, shellacs, and varnishes.
  • Requires little effort.
  • No chance of overloading your brush.
  • It’s more fun wielding a gun than a brush.

HVLP Woodworking Spray Gun vs Airless

Undoubtedly, the ideal machine for wood projects is an HVLP (high-volume low-pressure) sprayer.

As the name suggests, these units utilize a high volume of air delivered at a relatively low pressure (5 to 10 psi) to propel the coating medium. This results in little overspray, minimal bounceback, and reduces the risk of pooling. Furthermore, with super-fine atomization, they provide the smooth, blemish-free coat that’s crucial for varnishes and shellacs.

This is in contrast to airless machines that knock out over 3000 psi. While ensuring remarkably swift coverage, their finishes are not as smooth as those provided by HVLP units. Additionally, as woodworking mediums are typically low viscosity, the high pressure of airless sprayers can mean over-drenching your base material and significant overspray — leading to unnecessary paint wastage and a disappointing coat.

That’s not to say that airless units don’t have a place in some wood jobs. For large-scale timber projects such as weatherproofing decking or staining fencing, these speedy and powerful painters are ideal as a glossy and immaculate finish isn’t always necessary.

How To Choose the Best Spray Gun for Woodworking

The ideal woodworking paint sprayer depends on the mediums you plan on using, the finish that your project demands, and the size and scale of your timber job.

While not exhaustive, here are some factors I suggest examining when selecting your perfect machine.

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HVLP Format

As already mentioned, unless your work involves addressing vast expanses of wood — you need an HVLP machine for the ultimate in coat perfection.

Usually, these sprayers come in two formats: turbines and pneumatics.

Turbines are by far the most popular with both DIYers and serious woodworkers. The affordable price point, ease of portability, and straight-outta-the-box operation making them highly practical machines.

Pneumatics are usually the arena of serious trade users. Requiring an external compressor, they’re not ideal for indoor use or where they need to be moved from room to room. That said, their finish exceeds that of turbine models, and as such are often utilized by professional cabinetry restorers.

accuracy

Handheld or External Turbine

For most woodworking projects, a handheld sprayer such as the Control Spray Double Duty is ideal.

These feature a turbine housed within the gun’s casing, making them compact and highly portable. Typically single-stage machines (driven by one fan), they’re powerful enough to knock out low-viscosity woodworking mediums such as stains, sealers, and shellacs.

External turbines, like the PaintREADY station, have their drive unit in a separate motor housing, which usually sits on the floor. As there are no weight constraints, they can have more stages than handheld models, which means more power. Hence, they can provide faster coverage and propel denser liquids — useful if you’re using an oil-based gloss or thick primers on your wood jobs

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Nozzle Tip

The size of the nozzle determines the accuracy of delivery, the level of atomization, and the thickness of paints the gun can propel.

Typically, the smaller the diameter the greater the precision and the smoother the coat. Conversely, larger tips allow you to deliver denser paints and more rapid coverage.

While there are some exceptions (depending on the wattage and psi of the sprayers), a 0.8 to 1.3-mm tip is generally suitable for thin mediums like stains, and 1.3 to 1.8 mm for denser paints such as latexes.

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Cord and Hose Length

The longer the hose and cord, the further you can operate from mains outlets and the base unit (if using an external turbine). Additionally, the lengthier these two components, the less frequently you’ll have to reposition the turbine housing as you work around your target material.

However, while a Kraken-like hose may be beneficial when tackling substantial jobs such as staining a dining table, it can become a hindrance on more modest projects. There’s no advantage to a 100-foot hose if you’re completing precise work on wood carvings or moldings — it’s just going to get in the way, become a trip hazard, and wrap around you like an angry anaconda.

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Paint Cup Volume

Select a sprayer with a paint container relevant to the size of your job. For larger projects, such as substantial furniture, it may be worth choosing a gun with a 1.5-quart capacity. And, for smaller work such as staining wooden toys or shelving, a 0.875-quart should be sufficient.

Bear in mind that the larger the paint cup, the more weight in your hands. This is a crucial consideration if you’re using a handheld HVLP machine where you already have to wield the weight of the turbine in addition to the container.

How to Use a Paint Sprayer on Woodwork

Time for action — let’s get that sprayer shooting its load.

However, patience, young padawan. Before you crack on, check that you have the following items readily available to ensure the perfect results:

What You Will Need to Follow This Tutorial

How to Spray Paint Doors and Trim — Step By Step Guide

Step 1 — Preparation

  1. Put on your protective gear.
  2. Cover any furniture, ornaments, flooring, or carpeting with drop cloths or plastic sheeting. If you’re working outdoors, protect any planters, cycles, or grills — in fact, cover everything that doesn’t need to be painted or stained.
  3. Examine the wood for old tacks, screws, and staples sticking above the surface — remove with a claw hammer or screwdriver.
  4. If the woodwork has additional accessories such as knobs, handles, hinges, knockers, etc. remove these and safely store them.
  5. If there are areas of your woodwork that don’t need to be painted, shield these with masking tape.
  6. Make the surface of your woodwork ready for painting. At the very least, sand to a smooth sheen with either glasspaper or a palm sander.
  7. If required, remove any old paint with a scraper and heat gun. If there are seriously stubborn areas (and the paint is oil-based), consider using a little chemical stripper. For more info, check out my guide to stripping paint from wood.
  8. Carefully examine the woodwork for nicks, gashes, slits, cuts, holes, and cracks. Fill with wood filler and then sand to a smooth finish.
  9. Wash the woodwork with a sponge and warm soapy water to remove dust and paint flecks. Allow it to dry thoroughly.
  10. If you wish, you can give the woodwork a thin coat of primer; this base coat can make any missed imperfections stand out. Gently sand any issues you see and wash again before applying the topcoat.

Step 2: Paint Spraying Woodwork

  1. If necessary, dilute the varnish, stain, or paint — using thinners for oil-based mediums. Ideally, use a non-shedding paint stick and acrylic mixing cups.
  2. Set up your paint sprayer, following the guidelines from the manufacturer and using an extension cord if needed. Although these machines require different preparation depending on the model, I’ve put together general guides on setting up both turbine and pneumatic units.
  1. Execute a test spray into an old bucket to ensure that the paint is flowing smoothly and at the correct delivery intensity for your medium type. Ideally, utilize the lowest power setting possible — this will dramatically cut back on overspray with thin stains and sealers.
  2. With your gun nozzle 8 to 12 inches from your target material, begin to spray. Where possible, try to follow the wood’s grain. Use long, continuous side-to-side or up and down movements depending on the nature of your projects. Overlap each pass by about 30 to 50 percent.
  3. Wait for the paint or stain to dry completely, then check the adequacy of coverage. If needed, deliver a second coat.
  4. Remove the protective masking tape and replace any hardware.

Our Picks of the Best HVLP for Woodworking

Our Rating: 4.6
In my opinion, this is the best HVLP gun for woodworking currently on the market.

Focusing on the keen timber artisan, this handheld HVLP turbine unit boasts a variable flow dial, allowing you to select the delivery intensity to suit both your wood target and coating medium. A modest flow rate of 4.9 ounces per minute ensures steady delivery and prevents over-drenching of your base material. An included viscosity cup allows for effortless thinning if required.

This sprayer includes Wagner’s patented Control Finish nozzle, delivering a smooth and consistent finish with lacquers, shellacs, and varnishes. Additionally, a simple turn of the air cap permits you to switch between three fan patterns: vertical, horizontal, and circular.

This unit arrives with two paint containers — a one-quart cup for small work that requires precision, and a larger 1.5-quart cup for more substantial timber projects. A six-foot cord permits suitable operational freedom for most woodworking jobs, and a replaceable air filter prevents dirt ingress while ensuring a blemish-free coat.

And, at the end of your working day, this machine features Lock-N-Go technology — you can rapidly dismantle the unit for cleaning.

Pros

  • Choice of two paint containers.
  • Rated for both indoor and outdoor use.
  • Designed for moldings, trim, and small woodworking projects.
  • Excellent online HVLP spray gun reviews for woodworking.
  • Three spray patterns.
Cons

  • Thicker mediums, such as oil-based paints, will require thinning.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
In my opinion, this is the best HVLP gun for woodworking currently on the market.

Focusing on the keen timber artisan, this handheld HVLP turbine unit boasts a variable flow dial, allowing you to select the delivery intensity to suit both your wood target and coating medium. A modest flow rate of 4.9 ounces per minute ensures steady delivery and prevents over-drenching of your base material. An included viscosity cup allows for effortless thinning if required.

This sprayer includes Wagner’s patented Control Finish nozzle, delivering a smooth and consistent finish with lacquers, shellacs, and varnishes. Additionally, a simple turn of the air cap permits you to switch between three fan patterns: vertical, horizontal, and circular.

This unit arrives with two paint containers — a one-quart cup for small work that requires precision, and a larger 1.5-quart cup for more substantial timber projects. A six-foot cord permits suitable operational freedom for most woodworking jobs, and a replaceable air filter prevents dirt ingress while ensuring a blemish-free coat.

And, at the end of your working day, this machine features Lock-N-Go technology — you can rapidly dismantle the unit for cleaning.

Pros

  • Choice of two paint containers.
  • Rated for both indoor and outdoor use.
  • Designed for moldings, trim, and small woodworking projects.
  • Excellent online HVLP spray gun reviews for woodworking.
  • Three spray patterns.
Cons

  • Thicker mediums, such as oil-based paints, will require thinning.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.5
An excellent large woodwork project sprayer that’s suitable for addressing substantial cabinetwork, home interior timber features, and outdoor wood furniture.

This HVLP machine boasts a ground-sitting external turbine — reducing the weight of the spray gun and allowing your hands and arms to remain fatigue-free on those larger projects. Furthermore, this unit features two power settings; lower the output for thin sealers and steps and crank it up for thick wood primers and oil-based paints.

At the business end of the sprayer is Wagner’s respected iSpray head — a nozzle that’s as happy knocking out low-viscosity varnishes and shellacs as it is dense latexes and chalks. Additionally, it possesses a choice of three spray patterns, together with adjustable spray fan width, and the ability to adjust the volume delivery, preventing overspray, drenching, and wastage.

In keeping with its large-scale suitability, the unit incorporates a 15-foot hose — meaning less frequent relocation of the base unit on significant jobs. And, its 1.5-quart paint container has sufficient volume to paint over 120 square feet of timber without refilling.

Pros

  • Features a carrying handle to increase portability.
  • Easy-to-clean turbine housing.
  • Proprietary iSpray tech promises an even wood coat.
  • Compatible with unthinned timber paints.
  • Delivers 15 ounces of coverage per minute.
Cons

  • Lacks a fine-finish head to address trim, decorative work, and moldings.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
An excellent large woodwork project sprayer that’s suitable for addressing substantial cabinetwork, home interior timber features, and outdoor wood furniture.

This HVLP machine boasts a ground-sitting external turbine — reducing the weight of the spray gun and allowing your hands and arms to remain fatigue-free on those larger projects. Furthermore, this unit features two power settings; lower the output for thin sealers and steps and crank it up for thick wood primers and oil-based paints.

At the business end of the sprayer is Wagner’s respected iSpray head — a nozzle that’s as happy knocking out low-viscosity varnishes and shellacs as it is dense latexes and chalks. Additionally, it possesses a choice of three spray patterns, together with adjustable spray fan width, and the ability to adjust the volume delivery, preventing overspray, drenching, and wastage.

In keeping with its large-scale suitability, the unit incorporates a 15-foot hose — meaning less frequent relocation of the base unit on significant jobs. And, its 1.5-quart paint container has sufficient volume to paint over 120 square feet of timber without refilling.

Pros

  • Features a carrying handle to increase portability.
  • Easy-to-clean turbine housing.
  • Proprietary iSpray tech promises an even wood coat.
  • Compatible with unthinned timber paints.
  • Delivers 15 ounces of coverage per minute.
Cons

  • Lacks a fine-finish head to address trim, decorative work, and moldings.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.4
With fuss-free operation and an affordable price point, yet boasting impressive versatility, this HVLP sprayer is ideal for the casual DIYer looking to complete smaller scale and infrequent woodworking projects.

This handheld unit features a 450-watt internal motor that delivers sufficient grunt to knock out thin stains, urethans, sealers, and varnishes. It can also handle dense oil paints and primers. Three included brass spray tips — 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 mm — offer durability and a cleaner coat than their nylon counterparts.

What’s more, they’re color-coded to ease selection while you’re working.

This woodwork sprayer’s 1.25-quart paint container has a wide-fill feature to ensure mess-free replenishments and a screw-on lid — store the paint for future use without it drying out.

If you’re a paint spraying newbie, this product includes everything you need to start painting straight from the box. In addition to the gun and nozzle, it arrives with a cleaning brush, quick-start manual, and a gun wrench.

And, for peace of mind, not only does this machine arrive with a comprehensive two-year warranty, but it’s also backed by the mighty paint specialist Wagner SprayTech.

Pros

  • Ideal home use woodwork sprayer.
  • Impressive multi-medium compatibility for a small DIY machine.
  • Low overspray cuts back on material wastage.
  • Variable paint flow and volume control.
  • Arrives with a plethora of accessories.
Cons

  • The relatively short 18-inch cord will require an extension cable.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
With fuss-free operation and an affordable price point, yet boasting impressive versatility, this HVLP sprayer is ideal for the casual DIYer looking to complete smaller scale and infrequent woodworking projects.

This handheld unit features a 450-watt internal motor that delivers sufficient grunt to knock out thin stains, urethans, sealers, and varnishes. It can also handle dense oil paints and primers. Three included brass spray tips — 1.5, 2.0, and 4.0 mm — offer durability and a cleaner coat than their nylon counterparts. What’s more, they’re color-coded to ease selection while you’re working.

This woodwork sprayer’s 1.25-quart paint container has a wide-fill feature to ensure mess-free replenishments and a screw-on lid — store the paint for future use without it drying out.

If you’re a paint spraying newbie, this product includes everything you need to start painting straight from the box. In addition to the gun and nozzle, it arrives with a cleaning brush, quick-start manual, and a gun wrench.

And, for peace of mind, not only does this machine arrive with a comprehensive two-year warranty, but it’s also backed by the mighty paint specialist Wagner SprayTech.

Pros

  • Ideal home use woodwork sprayer.
  • Impressive multi-medium compatibility for a small DIY machine.
  • Low overspray cuts back on material wastage.
  • Variable paint flow and volume control.
  • Arrives with a plethora of accessories.
Cons

  • The relatively short 18-inch cord will require an extension cable.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.3
Designed with a focus on stains, sealers, and urethanes, this handheld HVLP turbine sprayer is great for fine-finishing woodwork jobs. And it suits both the hobbyist crafter and trade cabinet maker.

A trigger-mounted material volume flow dial means you can adjust the delivery to suit your current medium and target material — overspray and drenching risks are minimized and you get the flow that suits your project.

This staining gun incorporates Wagner’s Control Finish nozzle — an air head that not only provides fine atomization for a sheer coat but also allows for precise application on intricate areas such as trim and moldings. Furthermore, you can select either vertical, horizontal, or circular fan patterns to match your painting strokes.

The gun includes a 0.875-quart acrylic cup. Modest and compact, it enhances ease of operation, keeps weight to a minimum, and allows you to effortlessly access hard-to-reach or confined areas. Additionally, with an internal flexible suction tube, you can spray away from the horizontal plane with no loss in paint flow.

As with all Wagner handheld HVLP guns, this machine includes the brand’s trademarked Lock-N-Go feature. This permits you to remove the spray head and container effortlessly from the turbine unit, and then clean to remove any residual paint.

Pros

  • Affordable woodwork sprayer from a top-end manufacturer.
  • Ergonomic handle staves off fatigue.
  • Lightweight.
  • Ideal for multi-angle painting.
  • Six-foot cord.
Cons

  • Cannot lower the turbine power.
  • Unsuitable for dense paints, oil gloss will need thinning.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Designed with a focus on stains, sealers, and urethanes, this handheld HVLP turbine sprayer is great for fine-finishing woodwork jobs. And it suits both the hobbyist crafter and trade cabinet maker.

A trigger-mounted material volume flow dial means you can adjust the delivery to suit your current medium and target material — overspray and drenching risks are minimized and you get the flow that suits your project.

This staining gun incorporates Wagner’s Control Finish nozzle — an air head that not only provides fine atomization for a sheer coat but also allows for precise application on intricate areas such as trim and moldings. Furthermore, you can select either vertical, horizontal, or circular fan patterns to match your painting strokes.

The gun includes a 0.875-quart acrylic cup. Modest and compact, it enhances ease of operation, keeps weight to a minimum, and allows you to effortlessly access hard-to-reach or confined areas. Additionally, with an internal flexible suction tube, you can spray away from the horizontal plane with no loss in paint flow.

As with all Wagner handheld HVLP guns, this machine includes the brand’s trademarked Lock-N-Go feature. This permits you to remove the spray head and container effortlessly from the turbine unit, and then clean to remove any residual paint.

Pros

  • Affordable woodwork sprayer from a top-end manufacturer.
  • Ergonomic handle staves off fatigue.
  • Lightweight.
  • Ideal for multi-angle painting.
  • Six-foot cord.
Cons

  • Cannot lower the turbine power.
  • Unsuitable for dense paints, oil gloss will need thinning.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating: 4.3
Trade-pro cabinet makers, furniture restorers, and artisan woodworkers will accept nothing but the perfect coat finish. This HVLP pneumatic gun promises ultra-fine atomization with a minimum of overspray.

Three-digit trigger operation combined with a reassuring textured handle grip boosts stamina on larger crafting work. The gun boasts adjustable material and airflow to ensure consummate delivery while an inline pressure regulator and gauge ensure the ideal power level.

This pneumatic shooter includes a 0.63-quart paint container. Its gravity-fed design means that the compressor output can be kept to a minimum, reducing the likelihood of coat-spoiling bounceback. Furthermore, it ensures that every last drop in the paint cup is used, which cuts back on wastage.

Arriving with two nozzle tips — 1.4 and 2.2 mm — this gun is as competent at knocking out thin urethanes, stains, and sealers as it is thicker oil-based paints. Turning the nozzle enables you to adjust the spray fan width from a modest 1.2 inches to a generous 9.2 inches — make both precise passes and complete large-scale coverage with ease.

Working at 4.3 cubic feet per minute (cfm) at 40 psi, this woodworking gun works with the majority of small, home-consumer compressors.

Pros

  • Quick-refill paint cup.
  • Robust build that will withstand trade-grade use.
  • Arrives with a gun wrench and a cleaning brush.
  • Durable stainless steel tips.
  • Respected pneumatic gun manufacturer.
Cons

  • Removing and changing the tips can be challenging.
  • Not suitable for seriously dense mediums such as latex.
  • Paint container liable to drip when inverted.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Trade-pro cabinet makers, furniture restorers, and artisan woodworkers will accept nothing but the perfect coat finish. This HVLP pneumatic gun promises ultra-fine atomization with a minimum of overspray.

Three-digit trigger operation combined with a reassuring textured handle grip boosts stamina on larger crafting work. The gun boasts adjustable material and airflow to ensure consummate delivery while an inline pressure regulator and gauge ensure the ideal power level.

This pneumatic shooter includes a 0.63-quart paint container. Its gravity-fed design means that the compressor output can be kept to a minimum, reducing the likelihood of coat-spoiling bounceback. Furthermore, it ensures that every last drop in the paint cup is used, which cuts back on wastage.

Arriving with two nozzle tips — 1.4 and 2.2 mm — this gun is as competent at knocking out thin urethanes, stains, and sealers as it is thicker oil-based paints. Turning the nozzle enables you to adjust the spray fan width from a modest 1.2 inches to a generous 9.2 inches — make both precise passes and complete large-scale coverage with ease.

Working at 4.3 cubic feet per minute (cfm) at 40 psi, this woodworking gun works with the majority of small, home-consumer compressors.

Pros

  • Quick-refill paint cup.
  • Robust build that will withstand trade-grade use.
  • Arrives with a gun wrench and a cleaning brush.
  • Durable stainless steel tips.
  • Respected pneumatic gun manufacturer.
Cons

  • Removing and changing the tips can be challenging.
  • Not suitable for seriously dense mediums such as latex.
  • Paint container liable to drip when inverted.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
Our Rating 4.3
If your woodworking projects involve spraying away from the horizontal plane — such as addressing the underside of tables, cabinet corner interiors, or high-level molding or trim — you need a machine that can handle inverted use. This machine could be the solution.

Targeting serious woodworkers, this external turbine HVLP unit boasts a versatile 360-degree rotating air cap so you can spray at any angle with no loss of paint delivery or impact on the final finish.

At its heart is a three-stage 1200-watt turbine delivering 5.5 psi. In addition to effortlessly propelling polyurethanes, shellacs, and lacquers it can also drive thick oils, enamels, and even latex paint. Furthermore, housed in a robust metal casing, the base unit will stand up to hardcore pro-grade use.

The machine arrives complete with the respected Pro8 gun featuring a 1.3-mm tip. Adjustable spray patterns, material flow, and airflow enable the perfect delivery intensity. Its one-quart metal paint cup offers reassuring durability. And, as it’s internally coated with Teflon-like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), it has a non-stick surface that allows for maximum paint usage and fuss-free cleaning.

Operational freedom is enhanced by a 25-foot reinforced hose. Featuring quick-swivel connectors, it reduces the likelihood of pinches and kinks, ensuring smooth paint flow and keeping downtime to a minimum.

Pros

  • Delivery rate of 0.12 gallons per minute.
  • Non-bleeding aluminum gun.
  • Low overspray.
  • Made in the USA.
  • Gun-docking station for safe storage.
Cons

  • May be overkill for small crafting woodwork projects.
  • The three-stage turbine is relatively noisy.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price
If your woodworking projects involve spraying away from the horizontal plane — such as addressing the underside of tables, cabinet corner interiors, or high-level molding or trim — you need a machine that can handle inverted use. This machine could be the solution.

Targeting serious woodworkers, this external turbine HVLP unit boasts a versatile 360-degree rotating air cap so you can spray at any angle with no loss of paint delivery or impact on the final finish.

At its heart is a three-stage 1200-watt turbine delivering 5.5 psi. In addition to effortlessly propelling polyurethanes, shellacs, and lacquers it can also drive thick oils, enamels, and even latex paint. Furthermore, housed in a robust metal casing, the base unit will stand up to hardcore pro-grade use.

The machine arrives complete with the respected Pro8 gun featuring a 1.3-mm tip. Adjustable spray patterns, material flow, and airflow enable the perfect delivery intensity. Its one-quart metal paint cup offers reassuring durability. And, as it’s internally coated with Teflon-like polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), it has a non-stick surface that allows for maximum paint usage and fuss-free cleaning.

Operational freedom is enhanced by a 25-foot reinforced hose. Featuring quick-swivel connectors, it reduces the likelihood of pinches and kinks, ensuring smooth paint flow and keeping downtime to a minimum.

Pros

  • Delivery rate of 0.12 gallons per minute.
  • Non-bleeding aluminum gun.
  • Low overspray.
  • Made in the USA.
  • Gun-docking station for safe storage.
Cons

  • May be overkill for small crafting woodwork projects.
  • The three-stage turbine is relatively noisy.
  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Conclusion


To do justice to the natural beauty of wood, you need the perfect stain, varnish, or paint finish, which can be delivered by a woodworking spray machine.

These impressive units provide a fine, flaw-free finish — eliminating the all-too-common brush strokes and lost bristles problems. Plus, they require less effort than a handheld brush.

When choosing your machine, consider whether you want a small-project friendly handheld unit, or a more powerful external turbine machine for larger jobs. Additionally, check that the nozzle tip can deal with your timber-covering mediums and that the cup and hose have a sufficient size for your work.

Admittedly, for massive-scale wood projects — such as expansive areas of decking or lengthy border fencing — it might be worth checking out an airless unit instead. However, for an eye-catching coat on DIY or pro-artisan jobs — get hold of the best HVLP spray gun for woodworking.

Paint Sprayers for Woodworking FAQs

Q: Is It Better to Spray or Roll Cabinets?

Don’t roll, spray. Rollers typically leave a stippled finish and cannot cope with textured woodwork such as trim, moldings, or embossing. Instead, use a machine designed for addressing timber such as the Wagner Control Spray. It effortlessly covers decorative woodwork and leaves a clean, blemish-free finish on flat areas.

Q: Can I Use a Primer With a Spray Gun for Woodwork

Yes, however, primer is one of the more viscous paints, so ensure the spray gun has the power to propel the medium and a tip that’s wide enough to atomize the coating medium.

An excellent primer (and oil-based gloss) woodwork sprayer is the PaintReady Station.

Q: What Is the Best Airless Woodwork Sprayer?

For wood-crafting projects, furniture restoring or upcycling, and cabinet finishing, I wouldn’t recommend using an airless sprayer. The relatively high-pressure output can lead to overspray and pooling, and they lack the precise application required when addressing timber.

That said, if your wood jobs include large-scale areas where a super-fine finish isn’t necessary, such as decking and fences, I suggest the rapid coverage airless Magnum X5.

Q: Can I Thin Varnish WIth Water?

No. The majority of varnishes are oil-based, meaning they cannot mix with water. Instead, use a paint thinner designed for varnish paint.

Q: Is a 1.3-mm Tip Suitable for Woodstain?

Yes. A 1.3 mm tip is ideal for propelling low-viscosity woodstains from an HVLP turbine unit. For airless machines, due to their high-pressure output, you can use a narrower nozzle end, such as a 0.8 mm. For more advice, check out my guide on using the correct spray tip.

Q: What Size Compressor Do I Need to Spray Urethanes?

As urethane is a low-density medium, you can use a DIY-grade HVLP turbine machine, such as the HomeRight Super Finish, you don’t need a pneumatic power unit.

However, if you demand the ultra-fine finish delivered by LVLP and HVLP air guns. you can use a small, consumer-sized compressor. For example, the Husky Composite shooter works off just 4.3 cfm at 40 psi.