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Wagner Furno HT1000 Heat Gun Review

Editor Rating: 4.7/5

Outstanding

Wagner Furno HT1000

Reviewed by: Sean Masri

Last modified: Oct 7, 2020 @ 10:02 pm

  • Design
  • Functionality
  • Price

Review Summary:

Being simple to use, remarkably easy on the wallet, and suitable for a wide range of home applications — the Wagner HT1000 is an excellent entry-level heat gun that’s ideal for the novice or intermittent user.

Its two temperature settings provide the versatility to tackle typical household projects, from unfreezing door locks and pipes through to welding plastic and stripping paint. Dual fan speeds deliver optimum heat delivery — while hands-free operation allows you to tackle jobs that require precise control.

Featuring an integrated hanging hook and corrosion-resistant nozzle, this unit possesses both practicality and longevity, at the budget end of the market.

Hailing from Wagner SprayTech Corp — a brand with over 70 years’ experience in paint power tools — the HT1000 is the predecessor of the successful Furno 300 model.

Pros:

N
1200 watts.
N
Dual temperature settings — 750 and 1000 degrees Fahrenheit.
N
Hanging hook for easy storage.
N
Lightweight — 1.55 pounds.
N
Hands-free operation.
N
Ideal for the casual DIYer and householder.
N
Backed by a two-year warranty.

Cons:

N
Temperature range will be too small for some users.
N
No additional nozzles.
N
Basic design — lacks features for the professional or serious DIYer.

Features and Benefits of Wagner Furno HT1000 Heat Gun


If you’ve never used a heat gun before, or you only intend to use a hot air machine intermittently — the Wagner heat gun HT1000 could be the solution.

While simple to operate — and a more ‘basic’ model than many on the market — this unit still boasts numerous user-friendly features.

Dual Temperature


Take a look at the vast majority of entry-level heat guns — and you’ll discover they have one factor in common — a single temperature setting.

This is restrictive.

It’s akin to owning just one-size of screwdriver — and expecting it to function on large, small, Phillips, Pozidriv, and flathead screws.

However, the HT1000 has a dual temperature setting — 750 (LOW) and 1000 degrees (HIGH) Fahrenheit. Thus, you can adjust the heat intensity for the job in hand.

Selection is straightforward and requires no technical knowledge. A tactile rocker switch enables you to click between the HIGH and LOW settings with a finger press. For more delicate jobs, such as removing wood lacquer, use LOW — for hot work, like removing window putty, have the gun on HIGH.

Don’t worry if you’re not a heat gun aficionado. This machine comes complete with a guide that details the setting you need for particular projects.

However, despite having a choice of temperatures — more experienced or professional users may still find two heat settings restrictive. If you’re completing seriously delicate work — such as working on smartphone screens — it might be worth considering a unit featuring lower, more precisely selectable temperatures.

Integrated Hook


How many of your tools end up kicking around in drawers or forgotten about in the depths of your toolbox?

Too many, right?

Not only does this make your equipment difficult to locate when you really need it — knocks and scrapes can damage your gear — wrecking the aesthetic and impairing their use.

That’s why I welcome small, yet well thought out features, such as an integrated hook. This metal addition to the Wagner heat gun allows you to safely store your machine on a wall or pegboard. Or, if you don’t have a garage or workshop — you can hang the heat gun easily inside a cupboard or closet.

Hands-Free Operation


Even if you’re a casual DIYer — at some point you will have perfected the ‘mouth-hold.’

You know what I’m talking about.

You’re working on a particularly intensive or precise project — and you simply don’t have enough hands — so, you use your mouth. Typically, this will involve holding a small tool, such as a flashlight, between your lips — leaving your hands free.

Although I don’t encourage this course of action — it can sometimes help you out in a tight spot. However, it’s not ideal for heat guns.

For starters, you’d need weirdly enormous jaws to hold a heat gun. Secondly, I don’t recommend holding anything electrical in your moist mouth — especially when it can reach 1000 degrees Fahrenheit.

Hence, I welcome the hands-free capability of the Wagner HT1000 heat tool.

Just invert the machine into a vertical position and the unit will remain stable on its flattened base. This creates an upward stream of hot air — enabling you to use both of your hands to manipulate materials above this hot blast.

Corrosion-Resistant Nozzle


Oxidation is the enemy of every DIYer and homeowner.

This natural process — occurring by the combination of iron, oxygen, and water — disfigures and damages precious equipment.

Many guys oil their hand tools after use — a process that can prevent or delay rust. However, that’s something you really don’t want to do with a heat gun — since this gasoline-based compound is flammable.

Therefore, I’m pleased to say that Wagner has made the delicate nozzle of the HT1000 corrosion resistant — increasing its longevity. Furthermore, the manufacturer has constructed the body of the gun from impact-proof and heat-resistant polymers — ensuring durability. It’s features like these that allow Wagner to provide a two-year warranty on this machine.

Social Proof


The Wagner HT1000 is packed full of innovative and safety-enhancing features — but then, so was the Titanic.

The question is — how does this gun function in a real-world environment?

To check that this gun isn’t all show and no go — I researched the opinions of industry experts and users in the field.

Overall, the feedback was genuinely positive.

Repeatedly, guys lauded its rapid heat-up, 1000-degree temperature, and sensible price point. Admittedly, there were users who criticized the lack of mid-range heat choice — and the basic design of the handle. However, considering this is an entry-level unit — those observations are a little unfair — a Ford Fiesta isn’t going to win the Indy 500.

To see the satisfied users that I’m talking about — take a look at the feedback.

Alternatives to Wagner Furno HT1000


It’s a solid and reliable unit — but if the Wagner HT1000 is lacking in essential features for your particular needs — then consider these other examples.

Wagner HT3500


While coming from the same manufacturer — this model offers a greater degree of temperature flexibility.

Delivering heat from 250 to 1350 degrees Fahrenheit — you can select different temperature levels through push buttons and an LCD console. Thus, making it more appealing to those users who demand precise control.

  • Harder on the wallet than the HT1000.
  • Includes a cool-down setting — not a feature of the HT1000.
  • 12 heat levels — as opposed to just two on the HT1000.

Black & Decker HG1300


If you’re looking for a dual temperature unit — but want more features than the HT1000 — this may appeal.

While possessing the same 750 to 1000-degree heat range — this gun boasts an ergonomic handle, metal support stand, and more modern aesthetics than the Wagner. So, perhaps it will appeal more to those who are concerned about fatigue and safety.

  • Comparative price level to the HT1000.
  • Molded handle to sit neatly in the hand — unlike the ‘flat’ shape of the Wagner.
  • A metal support stand delivers greater stability than that of the HT1000.

Porter Cable PC1500HG


With an adjustable temperature dial providing a spectrum of 120-1150 degrees — this unit delivers greater heat versatility than the HT1000 — but at a price lower than most digital models.

Simple to operate — and incorporating a hanging ring — it may appeal to the relatively experienced and feature-demanding DIYer — who is keeping an eye on the bank account.

  • Variable temperature, unlike the HT1000.
  • Has a 1500-watt output — the Wagner has 1200 watts.
  • A more professional aesthetic than the HT1000.

Conclusion


For a reliable, budget friendly, and simple-to-operate heat gun — I propose that the Wagner HT1000 is ideal.

The dual temperature component should make this power tool perfectly capable of tackling household heat projects. The hands-free feature enables you to complete precise work — and the corrosion-resistant build will deliver longevity.

I admit this unit isn’t likely to suit tradespeople, large projects, or serious DIY enthusiasts. But for a basic machine that will not burn a hole in your pocket — the Wagner HT1000 is a handy unit to have in your household tool armory.

Wagner Furno HT1000 FAQs

Q: Does the HT1000 Come With a Battery and Charger?

No. The Wagner 0503008 HT1000 is a mains-powered unit, complete with a six-foot cable. It is not cordless.

Should you be looking for the freedom of a battery-powered heat gun — consider the Milwaukee 2688-20.

Q: Is the Wagner HT1000 Good for Removing old Vinyl Self-Stick Tiles?

Yes. The HT1000 will heat up and therefore soften the adhesive on your floor tiles — allowing you to remove them easily.

I recommend using the heat gun on the LOW setting for this application.

Q: Does the HT1000 Work Well to Remove Putty From Steel?

Yes. The Wagner 0503008 HT1000 1200 watt heat gun will remove putty.

However, this material is notoriously stubborn to soften. You will need a little patience and have the heat gun on the HIGH setting.

Q: How Much Is the Wagner HT1000?

While feature packed, the Wagner HT1000 is a budget-level unit, making it suitable for the casual or novice DIYer. To see the latest deal on this machine, check out the price here.

Q: Wagner HT1000 Uses?

Although simple to operate — the Wagner HT1000 is useful for a cornucopia of applications around your home.

This includes:

  • Removing urethane from furniture.
  • Softening linoleum and caulk.
  • Tackling stubborn putty.
  • Drying concrete before patching.
  • Heating up ignition systems.
  • Shrink and tube wrapping.
  • Applying window tint.
  • Solving frozen locks.
  • Stripping paint.
  • Loosening bolts and nuts.
  • Soldering water pipes.
  • Welding and bending plastic.
  • Waxing skis and surfboards.
  • Defrosting refrigerators and freezers.
Q: Wagner Furno 300 vs HT1000?

The Wagner Furno 300 is a step up from the HT1000 model.

While also a dual temperature unit — the Furno offers a higher upper temperature limit (1100 degrees), an ergonomic handle, and a modern aesthetic. Although still a budget machine, the Furno is a little harder on the pocket. For the current price, click here.

Q: Can I Use the Wagner HT1000 to Remove Old Paint Around the Window?

Yes. The Wagner is an excellent tool for paint removal. Ensure that you have the heat gun on the highest temperature setting for the best results.

Q: Can the Wagner HT1000 Dry Fabric Paint?

Yes, on the LOW setting, the HT1000 will dry paints on fabrics.

However, first find a small, hidden area of material on which to test the heat gun. This is because some fabrics react differently to heat.

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